Noriko Sugita, woodcut prints & Tom Hausken,paintings

Noriko Sugita, Sky, woodcut print

Noriko Sugita, Sky, woodcut print

November 1st – Dec 3, 2019
Opening Reception November 1st, 5-8 pm

NORIKO SUGITA:
Noriko Sugita’s work depends on momentary inspiration, letting shapes and colors explore deep thought.  Inventive and animated, her use of shapes and lines suggests human emotion and relationships or elaborate fictional worlds. Sugita often layers thin pigments of saturated color along with active marks through a reductive woodcut printing technique. While this makes for small editions it allows for increased detail and color. The color combinations she uses come from her own, Japanese traditions, such as from the palette of the kimono. The modern apparel industry uses about 2000 dye samples. Yuzen Kimono color samples are about 4000. Even in the 18th century there were over 800. Exploring such traditions informs Sugita’s art, even while working in different media, in a different land.
Originally from Hakodate, Japan, Noriko Sugita earned a BFA (summa cum laude) from Southern Oregon University in 2004. Exhibiting and teaching throughout the Pacific Northwest, she now resides in Beaverton, OR.

Tom Hausken, Exterior Evening, oil on canvas

Tom Hausken, Exterior Evening, oil on canvas

TOM HAUSKEN:                                                                       Tom Hausken was born in Minneapolis Minnesota and currently lives in the Ashland, OR. Mr. Hausken is a graduate of Seattle Pacific University (1985) and continued his studies in drawing and painting at the University of Washington (1987) with Spencer Moseley and Michael Dailey. He has received 2 Fellowship Residencies from the Vermont Studio Center; a Clowes Fellowship in 2010 and a Pollock-Krasner Fellowship in 2016. He was the Artist in Residence at the Yakima Valley Museum in 2017. His paintings are rich with texture and layering. His paintings are fundamentally grounded in landscape forms and colors yet he avoids including details that would infer a specific place. Instead they invoke a sense of place in paint.