Page 47

2016 Ashland Gallery

C O N T I N U E D Ashland Gallery Guide 47 Pegi Smith The drive to Pegi’s home studio has a few twists and beautiful turns, but it is worth it in visual rewards both natural and artistic – even historic, passing Cole Station on the way. Get an appointment with detailed instructions. She showed us a snapshot of what four feet of snow looks like at her back door, so wait ‘til after the spring thaw! You will get a warm welcome. When Pegi started making art in this beautiful place overlooking a steep-sided valley in the Colestin, it was in ceramics. Fine hand-formed flowers and vines on vases were created in her clay studio. One day all the shelves in her kiln collapsed on each other. It was an entire order made to deliver. It all had to be made again. Afterwards she left ceramics for painting. During that time she also had a clothing store on A Street in Ashland. Her beginning in painting came out of a state of passion, an epiphany. Her acrylics began as abstract fields of varying colors. The strong line and filigree goes in over the top and figures emerge, whether human or animal, reminiscent of a rich tapestry. Her style evolves and she likes to keep the pieces that mark each change. For some time she drove up and down the west coast doing art fairs. She came down to Southern Oregon, on a whim and a friend’s recommendation, from her dream home in Monroe, in the hills east of Seattle. After visiting four days she found her place here. She sold her home, started fresh, then divorced from a 24-year marriage. She quit art, isolated herself and recovered alone. transformation into an abstract painter. “Composition is key in undertaking abstraction..” Patrick is still studying color theory. “Color value moves the spaces, expressing values.” He paints in ink, watercolors, and acrylic on canvas, in bright colors. Getting up early, he paints a few hours, goes away, comes back, never allowing it to weary him. His son wrote a song, “Can’t Stop Running” to which Patrick made a painting. He says, There are two kinds of art, the kind painted just for the artist, and the art for everyone.” “It’s nice not having to earn a living from art.” He does sell, but still has the pleasure of a hobby. He is reading to stay current on some color principles. He feels he is evolving to abstract expressionism. On a scale from 1 to 10, with 1 being realism, 5 being impressionism and 10 being abstraction, he puts his work at 8. His intense learning mode has him thinking outside the box; seeing the Cubists paint all four sides of something expanded his perception. The summer fires influenced the dark theme of some paintings, the scorched earth. Painting is a drive. “Gotta have that good feeling again,” he says, “I love colors.” See Patrick Beste’s listing on page 28


2016 Ashland Gallery
To see the actual publication please follow the link above