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2016 Ashland Gallery

Burns demonstrates still life drawing throughout her class. 42 Ashland Gallery Guide In turn, Burns’ own teaching has deepened her education because “if you teach something, you know it better.” An extrovert, Burns loves the connection of the classroom and how it energizes her own solitary time in the studio. She also notes how teaching art is linked to other disciplines. Mathematics is entwined with the study of perspective, for example. Chemistry lies within the mixture of paints. An understanding of Anatomy is essential for life drawing. “You reinforce your own ideas through teaching because they are being tested all the time,” Burns says. “I’ve really grown as an artist through my teaching.” When sculptor Kevin Christman, who teaches various workshops around the valley and beyond, thinks about teaching, he immediately points to the apprenticeship model. “It’s the old university system,” he explains. “The master passes on knowledge in return for work.” In fact, walk into Christman’s studio in Talent these days, and you might discover two apprentices wrapping pieces of stained glass with copper foil. They are working on windows. Christman, who does a lot of public and commissioned art, was chosen to create stained glass windows for the St. Mary’s School Chapel in Medford. He’s been working on the project for four years, designing, researching, executing. He is almost done. Students from St. Mary’s often visit Christman’s studio to hear him talk about the windows and his life as an artist. Noting that stained glass windows are a traditional “educational tool” in that they teach the Biblical parables through images, Christman hopes his design takes “a fresh approach.” Photos by Mark Arinsberg “If you teach something you know it better.” Elaine Frenett listens closely in Christman’s clay workshop during the Art Inspires Ashland event. Photo by Jim Chamberlain


2016 Ashland Gallery
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